CDEI


ABOUT
The Western Rural Development Center was excited to present the Community Development Extension Institute. Designed for practitioners in not-for-profit organizations, private consulting firms, cooperative extension, and state, regional, and local governments throughout the western U.S. who have a community development component to their work.

The Institute offered two days of training, best practices, three keynote sessions, a Resource Fair, and networking opportunities. View the agenda for details. 

MEET THE SPONSORS!
CDEI is pleased to introduce you to our event sponsors. We encourage you to learn more about them by visiting their websites. 
Arco Butte Business Incubation Center Division of Governmental
Studies & Services - WSU
Western Rural Development Center
Website Website Website

SESSION DESCRIPTIONS
Click to download the session descriptions. 

Keynote Addresses
WealthWorks 
Bruce Weber and Mallory Rahe, Oregon State University
Rural Wealth Creation is emerging as a framework for understanding economic and community development. This framework has been translated into a formal development implementation process, WealthWorks, by the Ford Foundation, YellowWood Associates, and others. Bruce Weber, an author and co-editor of an upcoming book on Rural Wealth Creation will describe the central motivation of wealth creation: strengthening demand driven local value chains through intentional inclusivity that build wealth across eight capitals. Mallory Rahe, who recently attended a national training on facilitating WealthWorks projects, will then describe ongoing efforts to use this approach in the Pacific Northwest.
 
Extensions' Role in Economic Development
Tom Harris, University of Nevada, Reno 
With the impacts of the "Great Recession" and accompanying unsettled employment picture in both urban and rural America, the discussion of extensions place in economic development education is as urgent as it was when Bruce Weber outlined this problem in the 1980's. As Weber pointed out in 1980 and is still relevant today that the difficulty in defining the appropriate role for extension educators in economic development often hinders the effectiveness and relevancy of these outreach programs.  This session will discuss the ongoing changes in the economy and how extension educators can develop effective, timely, and relevant economic development outreach programs.
Weber, Bruce, "Extension's Role in Economic Development". Journal of Extension, Volume 25, Number 1, Spring 1987.
  
Natural Resource Link With Community and Economic Development
Steve Campbell, University of Arizona 
Participants will take home an understanding of the processes (collaboration, planning, and implementation) involved in redirecting the degraded, dying, and non-functioning forest ecosystem in the White Mountains Region of Arizona, onto a pathway of recovery for both ecosystem functionality and recovery of regional resource dependent communities.  The take home message is how processes of ecosystem restoration and the recovery of economic viability for rural, resource dependent, communities can be leveraged into a synergistic process mutually beneficial to all. Enhanced functionality of ecosystem services, which local communities depend on for tourism and the amenity economy of the region, is being delivered through restoration efforts and a newly developed processing infrastructure providing $23,000,000 in new resource based dollars annually.
 
Skills-Building Workshops (each will be offered twice)
Ripple Effects Mapping
Debra Hansen, Washington State University
Learn how to evaluate complex group or community activities with Ripple Effects Mapping. Using a mind-mapping framework, it actively engages members of all ages with a creative and useful evaluation technique. It exposes the forgotten or behind-the-scene activities that can ripple out from a specific educational program and gathers the untold stories where groups can visualize their accomplishments and build on each other's successes. This process can indentify partnerships, unique contributions, and gaps in delivery and then provide a way to determine short, medium and long-term outcomes. It's an easy technique to learn and you'll leave the training understanding how to use this simple tool.
 
Developing Community Profiles
Lena Etuk and Mallory Rahe, Oregon State University
Data are an essential part of economic development decision making, collecting is often a frustrating process filled with too many choices and not enough guidance on how to make meaningful interpretations. As a result, many people rely on county profiles as a way to quickly access information. This workshop will demonstrate how participants can create useful county profiles. Participants will learn how to use a question driven approach to find and select indicators, establish benchmarks that matter, and review sources of county level data.
 
Conflict Management
Steve Daniels, Utah State University
Conflict can arise at many scales in our personal and professional lives, particularly when core values are at stake and difficult choices need to be made.  Effective management of conflict is a critical skill for Extension personnel who supervise employees and volunteers, serve on community boards, interact with funders, and respond to university directives (in other words-all of us.)  This session will focus on interpersonal/organizational conflict (as opposed to broader community/political conflict) and will offer opportunities to discuss common conflict dynamics in Extension.
 
Strategies for Managing Challenging Facilitation Situations 
Amanda Murphy, The William D. Ruckelshaus Center and Washington State University 
Experienced facilitators know that even the simplest meeting can suddenly derail.  Anticipating and being prepared for challenging situations before they arise is an important facilitator skill.  In this session, participants will learn about group dynamics and potential sources of complexity and conflict. Participants will explore some common dilemmas that facilitators encounter when facilitating groups and will acquire tools for working through challenging situations.
  
Asset-Based Community Visioning
Lorie Higgins, University of Idaho  
Participants will learn several approaches to asset identification and mapping, and how to effectively lead community groups to develop dynamic and inspirational visions for the future.  Take home tools for participants include an appreciative inquiry approach to strength and asset identification, use of mapping software and the community capitals framework for creating an asset inventory and a step-by-step guide to building an energizing vision that is a foundation for action.   Flip the switch in rural communities from a glass half empty perspective to a glass half full perspective and collective hope for filling it the rest of the way!
 
The Dollar-Game
Paul A. Lewin, University of Idaho
A broader understanding of how a community's economy works is helpful but not easy to bring about. University of Idaho. We have piloted the "Dollar Game" where participants experience how value-added activities; import & export; and distant ownership affect local wealth creation. The game is a gross simplification of reality, leaving out many factors and complexities that underpin a true economy. However, we found that the game makes it possible to discuss historic developments of a local economy in a value-neutral manner and allow players to experience and internalize complex economic concepts like induced impact and import substitution. Further, this game demonstrates how a local economy creates wealth and how import and export activities can fundamentally alter the structure of the economy and leverage or diminish local wealth creation.
 
Community Coaching
Barb Brody, Oregon State University
All communities are faced with various challenges. One approach to address the challenges is to go into a community and tell them what needs to change. This approach will result in short term impacts. On the other hand, taking a "community coach" approach guides local community members through a process to identify local concerns and issues then coaching the community thorough the change process. Coaching is a leadership strategy to assist groups with identifying community issues and strengths, setting goals, taking action, decision making and developing natural strengths within the members of a community. This workshop will provide participants with practical tools to coach communities through leadership development and joint learning to increase capacity of the community members and impact the community. 
 
Applications Sessions
AgriCULTURE Tourism
Holly George, University of California 
Learn about Opportunities to Engage Communities, Build Bridges and Strengthen Relationships Among People working in Agriculture, Food, Nature, Art, Recreation & Tourism;  Expand Economic Diversification Options; Look at local and regional Resources Through New Eyes, Share Experiences and Ideas;  Explore Ways to Collaborate on Policy, Research, and Outreach.  
 
Healthcare and Community Development
Craig Nolte, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco
Join this session to learn how your health institution, government agency, financial institution or nonprofit organization can achieve its goals and contribute to improving health outcomes. The connections between health and community development have become increasingly apparent.  Healthier people are more able to obtain employment, support their families, and contribute to society as a whole.  Studies show that over 80% of the factors that affect our health are within our control, and that a significant determinant of our health is how we live our lives and the surrounding economic, social and physical environment.   This session will explore innovative cross-sector solutions, including potential roles for your organization, as well as possible resources.   
 
"Why don't they come?" Effectively Engaging Latino Audiences in Community Development Programs
José García-Pabón, Washington State University
Latino/Hispanic (and other groups of) immigrants have multiple cultural differences from the US main stream culture.  Values and attitudes can be different and even divergent between the two populations.  This workshop will address how and why Latino cultural values need to be considered when reaching out to Latino immigrant families with Community Development programs. This session will answer the question "why don't they come?" for community development educators that try and fail to engage Latino and other immigrant audiences.  In this session participants will increase their knowledge and acquire skills to cross culturally interact with Latino immigrant communities.  Participants will understand why cultural values and beliefs of Latino immigrants matter in designing and implementing community development programs and activities. 
 
Sustainability
Roslynn Brain, Utah State University
In this session, participants will engage in the process of transitioning communities from thought to action regarding sustainability. Community-Based Social Marketing techniques by Doug McKenzie-Mohr will serve as the focus. Specifically, breaking larger issues down into action items, conducting barrier-benefit analyses, use of prompts, commitment, norms, incentives, communication, and removal of external barriers will be explored via interactive activities and information. We will also work through the process of participatory action research (ways to include stakeholders throughout the planning process) and strategies to evaluate impact - all of which will empower you in greening the communities you work with.  
 
Western Extension Programs in Food Systems
Brad Gaoloch, Washington State University; Holly George, University of California, Cinda Williams, University of Idaho, and Clea Rome, Washington State University 
Learn about Extension's role in food systems work in three western states.  Ample time will be provided for audience members to share current programming efforts in their states and for discussion about the future of Western Extension in a range of emerging arenas related to the local production, consumption and distribution of food.
 
Youth Entrepreneurship
Katie Hoffman & Lyle Hansen, University of Idaho  
This workshop will look at two Idaho programs focusing on youth entrepreneurial development. Participants will learn how a rural Idaho community turned a lost grant into an opportunity to build funds and life skills as well as explore how a 4-H curriculum was used to reach a Hispanic population. Both programs have built life skills and entrepreneurial skills in youth. Take home tools will include a resource list, curriculum, successes and lessons learned.
 
Local Government Leadership
Dan Clark, Montana State University
Participants will learn the importance of building capacity of local government officials and the important role government plays in creating thriving communities.  Learn about the MSU Local Government Center and their role in training new and long serving elected and appointed officials.  Topics covered will include principles of good governance, building trust, difference between government and private/nonprofits and the role of government in community development.  Participants will receive sample curricula and learn how to develop custom curriculum to training municipal and county elected and appointed officials.
 
Entrepreneur Friendly Communities
Rick Wolk, University of Alaska
In order to best support entrepreneurs and small business owners, local, regional and state leadership need to first fully understand how entrepreneurs think, what they need and how best to address their needs. Trainings, targeted services and even changes to the way governments provide services are not always effective due to this lack of understanding. This workshop will share best practices and examples of how communities have addressed this disconnect and have better prepared themselves to identify resources, address entrepreneurs' needs, and create a new culture for building programs that are better incorporated into the communities overall economic development strategies and plan


*Times of each session are subject to change. Updates will be posted here and provided onsite.

Day ONE - Wednesday, February 26, 2014

Time

Location

Session/Activity

12-1PM

LANDING II 2nd Floor

Registration / Check-in

1-1:30 PM

ASPEN 2nd Floor

Welcome by Don Albrecht (WRDC) and Lorie Higgins (ID)

 

 

Basic Core CD Skills
ASPEN 2nd Floor

Advanced CD Core Skills

WHITE WATER 3rd Floor

Best Practices in CD Programming

RIVER FORK 3rd Floor

1:45-3:00 PM

Basic-ASPEN 2nd Floor
Advanced-WHITE WATER 3rd Floor
Best Practices-RIVER FORK 3rd Floor

B1

Community Coaching
Barbara Brody (OR)

A1

Facilitation
Amanda Murphy (WA)

P1

Local Government Leadership
Dan Clark (MT)

3:15-4:30 PM

Basic-ASPEN 2nd Floor
Advanced-WHITE WATER 3rd Floor
Best Practices-RIVER FORK 3rd Floor

B2

Developing Community Profiles
Lena Etuk (OR) 
Mallory Rahe (OR)

A2

Conflict Management
Steve Daniels (UT)

P2

Entrepreneur-Friendly Communities
Rick Wolk (AK)

4:30-6:00 PM

CEDAR 2nd Floor

Resource Fair (exhibits) and Networking Social (appetizers and no host bar)

Day TWO - Thursday, February 27, 2014

Time

Location

Session/Activity

8:00-8:45 AM

APSEN 2nd Floor

Keynote
Natural Resource Link with Community and Economic Development – Steve Campbell (AZ)

 

 

Basic Core CD Skills
ASPEN 2nd Floor

Advanced CD Core Skills
WHITE WATER 3rd Floor

Best Practices in CD Programming
RIVER FORK 3rd Floor

9-10:45 AM

Basic-ASPEN 2nd Floor
Advanced-WHITE WATER 3rd Floor
Best Practices-RIVER FORK 3rd Floor

B3

Asset-Based Community Visioning
Lorie Higgins (ID)

A3

Leadership Development Part 1
Juanita Waits (AZ)
Kathee Tifft (ID)
Jacque Miller (CO)

P3

Youth Entrepreneurship
Katie Hoffman (ID)
Lyle Hansen (ID)

10:45-10:55 AM

APSEN 2nd Floor
WHITE WATER 3rd Floor
RIVER FORK 3rd Floor

REFRESHMENT BREAK (outside each meeting room)

 

11AM – 12:15 PM

Basic-ASPEN 2nd Floor
Advanced-WHITE WATER 3rd Floor
Best Practices-RIVER FORK 3rd Floor

B4

Evaluation:
Ripple Effects Mapping
Debra Hansen, WA

A4

Leadership Development Part 2
Juanita Waits (AZ)
Kathee Tifft (ID)
Jacque Miller (CO)

P4

Western Extension Programs in Food Systems
Cinda Williams (ID)
Brad Gaolach (WA)
Holly George
 (CA)
Clea Rome (WA)

12:30-1:30 PM

THE EVERGREEN 2nd Floor

Ignite Session
Community Development Institute - Jerry Miller (Idaho Commerce)

Lunch Keynote
WealthWorks – Bruce Weber and Mallory Rahe (OR)

1:45-2:30 PM

Basic-ASPEN 2nd Floor
Advanced-WHITE WATER 3rd Floor
Best Practices-RIVER FORK 3rd Floor

B5

Developing Community Profiles
Lena Etuk (OR)
Mallory Rahe (OR)

A5

Facilitation
Amanda Murphy (WA)

P5

Healthcare and Community Development
Craig Nolte (Federal Reserve Bank)

2:30-2:40 PM

APSEN 2nd Floor
WHITE WATER 3rd Floor
RIVER FORK 3rd Floor

REFRESHMENT BREAK (outside each meeting room)

 

2:45-4:00 PM

Basic-ASPEN 2nd Floor
Advanced-WHITE WATER 3rd Floor
Best Practices-RIVER FORK 3rd Floor

B6

Community Coaching
Barbara Brody (OR)

A6

Understanding How Your Local Economy Works: The Dollar Game
Paul Lewin (ID)
Willem Braak (CA)

P6

Community Development with Hispanic Audiences
Jose Garcia-Pabon (WA)

4:00 PM

 

R&R – After a busy day it’s time to get out and explore Boise and unwind with your colleagues.

Day THREE - Friday, February 28, 2014

Time

Location

Session/Activity

8:00-8:45 AM

THE IVY 2nd Floor

Breakfast Keynote

Extension’s Role in Economic Development – Tom Harris (NV)

 

 

Basic Core CD Skills
ASPEN 2nd Floor

Advanced CD Core Skills
WHITE WATER 3rd Floor

Best Practices in CD Programming
RIVER FORK 3rd Floor

8:45-10:00 AM

Basic-ASPEN 2nd Floor
Advanced-WHITE WATER 3rd Floor
Best Practices-RIVER FORK 3rd Floor

B8

Evaluation:
Ripple Effects Mapping
Debra Hansen, WA

A3

Understanding How Your Local Economy Works: The Dollar Game
Paul Lewin (ID)
Willen Braak (CA)

P5

Agritourism
Holly George (CA)

 

10:00-10:15 AM

APSEN 2nd Floor
WHITE WATER 3rd Floor
RIVER FORK 3rd Floor

REFRESHMENT BREAK (outside each meeting room)

 

10:15-11:30 AM

Basic-ASPEN 2nd Floor
Advanced-WHITE WATER 3rd Floor
Best Practices-RIVER FORK 3rd Floor

B9

Asset-Based Community Visioning
Lorie Higgins (ID)

A4

Conflict Management
Steve Daniels (UT)

P6

Sustainability
Roslyn Brain (UT)

11:30 AM - Noon

APSEN 2nd Floor

Closing Session

 

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RESOURCE FAIR

The Resource Fair and Social provides a unique opportunity for registered attendees/presenters to showcase your work. CDEI attendees will meet and mingle at the end of the opening day with the Resource Fair the highlight of this evening activity. The exhibits will remain open throughout the Institute.

The Resource Fair is limited to 15 tabletop exhibit spaces awarded on a first-come, first-served basis. Each tabletop exhibit space includes one 6’ draped table, two chairs, one power strip and one extension cord, and wireless internet connectivity. The exhibit room will be locked each evening and remain open each day to allow attendees to visit the exhibits. Exhibits must be torn down by 1:00 PM, Friday, February 28th. 

The cost is $75 per exhibit. Tabletop exhibit spaces are limited to one exhibit space per registrant/presenter. To reserve your tabletop exhibit space, complete and submit a registration form and select ‘Resource Fair Exhibit.’ Submission of a completed registration form does not guarantee an exhibit space. You will be notified via email whether or not you were one of the first 15 registrations received.  

Exhibit Shipping
You may ship your exhibit materials directly to The Grove Hotel. Please include the information listed below on each box/envelope. The Western Rural Development Center is not responsible for your materials. 
The Grove Hotel
ATTN: whomever will be on site requesting the package
HOLD FOR: Western Rural Development Center 2/26 – 2/28/14
245 S Capitol Blvd
Boise, ID 83702

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WHO SHOULD ATTEND
The Community Development Extension Institute is designed for:

  • Not-for-profit organizations

  • Urban/rural development

  • Regional planning councils

  • Extension and outreach programs

  • Utilities, telephone and electric cooperatives

  • Chambers of Commerce

  • Local, state, and federal government

  • Community art/cultural affairs agencies

  • Community Betterment and Main Street programs

  • Neighborhood associations (housing programs and departments)

  • Local health, social services, and youth development agencies

  • Churches and faith-based organizations 


REGISTRATION FEES AND DETAILS - click here to register! 
$199 - Early Bird (deadline extended to midnight January 31st)
$275 - Regular (effective February 1st)
$100 – Presenter/Trainer (only scheduled presenters/trainers are eligible for this discounted rate)
$75 - Resource Fair (exhibit space) Limited to 15 exhibit spaces, awarded on a first-come,
first-served basis, and eligible only to registering attendees/presenters.

The Early Bird, Regular, and Presenter/Trainer registration fee include admission to all three days of the Institute, the Resource Fair and Social, refreshment breaks on day two, lunch on day two, and breakfast on day three, plus Institute materials including a pre-loaded jump drive with Institute materials and attendee/presenter/trainer/exhibitor contact information.

The Resource Fair registration fee includes one tabletop exhibit space with one 6’ draped table, one power strip and one extension cord, and wireless internet. Plus a listing in the Institute program!

Cancellation Policy
Cancellations must be received in writing via email to betsy.newman@usu.edu. Cancellations received by midnight January 31, 2014, will be refunded the registration fee minus a $75 processing fee. Cancellations received after midnight January 31, 2014, will not be eligible for a refund. Contact betsy.newman@usu.edu to discuss substitutions.

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER!

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Meeting Venue and Lodging

The Community Development Extension Institute will be held at The Grove Hotel in Boise, Idaho, and a limited number of lodging rooms have been reserved for Institute participants.

Grove Hotel – Downtown Boise – click here for directions http://www.grovehotelboise.com/directions-en.html
245 S. Capitol Blvd
Boise, Idaho
Tel: 1-888-961-5000
Website: http://www.grovehotelboise.com

Rates and Reservations
The Institute has reserved a limited number of hotel rooms for the group.
Rate: $114 per room, per night
Group Name: Western Rural Development Center
Reservations (By telephone only): 1-888-961-5000 and be sure to tell them you are with the Western Rural Development Center group.

DEADLINE EXTENDED! To secure the group rate, lodging reservations must be made by January 31, 2014.

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Sponsorship Opportunities

We invite you to be a partner in this effort. The Community Development Extension Institute is providing a unique opportunity to interested organizations and universities to further engage with this audience through sponsorships. Four sponsorship levels are available and the details of each are listed below.


SPONSORSHIP LEVELS

Friend - $250

  • Name and logo listed on event website with hyperlink to your institution/company/organization website

  • Name and logo listed in electronic promotions

  • Name and logo printed in program

  • Inclusion in all press releases

Forerunner - $750
All of the benefits of the Friend Level Sponsorship plus:

  • One (1) complementary registration to the Institute

Fellow - $1,250
All of the benefits of the Friend and Forerunner Level Sponsorships plus:

  • One (1) complementary exhibit booth (8’ draped table) in the Resource Fair

  • Sponsorship Mentions in the WRDC’s Twitter feed and Facebook page

Founding Sponsor - $2,500
All of the benefits of the Friend, Forerunner, and Fellow Level Sponsorships plus:

  • Exclusive sponsorship of a portion of the Institute (such as the opening social, keynote speaker, lunches, refreshment breaks) to include special mention on the event website, in electronic promotions, in the printed program, and with special signage at the reception.

  • Introduction as a Founding Sponsor to the Western Rural Development Center’s email list

  • Opt-in Offers to your mailing lists for registering participants

If you are interested in becoming a sponsor but require special arrangements, please contact Betsy Newman at the Western Rural Development Center.

Sponsor Contact Information

Betsy H. Newman

Event Coordinator

Western Rural Development Center

betsy.newman@usu.edu

435.797.0218

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The CDEI Planning Team

Don Albrecht, Western Rural Development Center (Co-Chair)

Monica Babine, Washington State University

Debra Hansen, Washington State University

Lorie Higgins, University of Idaho (Co-Chair)

Jacque Miller, Colorado State University

 

Questions

Lorie Higgins, Co-Chair

University of Idaho

higgins@uidaho.edu

 

Contact

Betsy H. Newman

Western Rural Development Center

Utah State University

(435) 797-0218

betsy.newman@usu.edu

 

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